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Sparkler Issue | Sparkler Monthly

audaciouslyexcursioning:

Hey! Consider joining Sparkler Monthly, a Multi-media E-magazine for the Female Gaze!! :D They have a bunch of really cool stories with SO MANY interesting storylines, plots, and characters!! 

But the stories aren’t just in the magazine, you can also get them as e-books, paperbooks, and even CDs! :O From comics to prose to straight up audio, they have it all in the bag. :)

Honestly please go to the link and check it out, it seems really cool!

Thanks so much for your support!

*blushes*

Filed under sparkler monthly sparkler membership drive

25 notes

Sparkler Update: Our Monthly Membership Exclusive is live!

sparklermonthly:

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Today’s Sparkler update is an interview with Jen Lee Quick, creator of Off*Beat and Gatesmith! This is our first podcast interview, available now to members only—you can listen here: http://sparklermonthly.com/exclusive/sparkler-podcast-03/

The interview features a ton of history and background on Off*Beat and Gatesmith, some insight on the Off*Beat audio drama we’ll be doing if the membership drive reaches that level, plus great insider info as Jen talks about her process and world-building. We had an awesome time chatting with her, and we think you’ll all enjoy it a lot, too! 

Mid-week reblog! ^_^

Filed under sparkler update member exclusive membership exclusive jen lee quick podcast Off*Beat gatesmith

25 notes

card-sliding for diversity

foxnettle:

I’m going to talk about publishing—specifically, my publisher, sparklermonthly. But first, I’m going to talk about apologies.

The word sorry leaves my mouth a lot. And yet, never often enough. Sometimes, it’s fear that stops me. Or ego. Usually ego, especially because the fear is often there because my ego is a coward (clarification: I am). But I try to keep my ego in tight-check, so I’m usually able to get the apology out. Sorry.

I’ve also had apologies made to me, and in both instances (as the giver and receiver of remorse), apologies can be genuine or they can clog themselves with inaction. Because apologies are half-assed when all you do is say sorry. You can look at me all frowny and penitent, with contrition bleeding sweet as liquified lollipops from your eyesockets, but if action doesn’t accompany your words, sorry sounds like an insult. Same goes for me: if I ever apologize and neglect to follow up, I am (again) sorry, I have failed and you now have permission to stuff my socks full of meal worms and snap my drum sticks and poke holes in my rain pants. I will be better. Do better.

Here are a couple guides to apologizing: Getting Called Out: How to Apologize and Apologies: What, When, and How.

This framework of inaction = questionable sincerity, and action = sincerity that might actually mean something can be applied elsewhere, too. For my purposes, I’m using it to talk about writing and publishing—-specifically, women and diversity in writing and publishing. Other people have discussed it (eg: this from malindalo; Writing, Editing, Inclusivity: We’re All in this Together from kameronhurley; and this from nattosoup), with more eloquence and intelligence than I will, but this is an important conversation. And a conversation is only a conversation if there’s some conversing occurring.

A piece of the dialogue: you can talk all you want about diversity in publishing and narratives, but true support is action. I can say I support diverse authors all I want, but if I go out and spend all my (paltry) allotment for book purchases on Scott Lynch and George RR Martin, then I have failed. I mean, I fucking love Scott Lynch (GRRM I enjoy, but not to the same extent), but I love Aliette de Bodard and Ann Leckie just as much, so wouldn’t it make just a little sense for me to swipe my card just as often (if not more) for them?

I’m not saying don’t ever give a straight white cis male your money ever again, the end. I’m saying that if you believe in something, act on it. Give women your money, prove we have value, that we sell. Which, yeah, is objectifying as hel and a really terrible way to frame this, BUT. In many ways, this is how worth is established. With money. You want more diverse writers, stories, characters, settings? Buy it ALL. Everything you claim keeps you grinning and thrilling and screaming in biblioporno bliss? Let it feed upon the belly of your bank account. (This is, also and by the way, a reminder to myself.)

As I said earlier, I’m just pissing at the mouth, basically regurgitating what my betters have said, so here’s my personal spin on it:

I have a serialized novel running in Sparkler Monthly.   (It’s called Skyglass, and is about sex, cyber-elves, rock ‘n’ roll, and murderous firecats). Sparkler Monthly is a multimedia publisher of comics, prose and audio dramas written from the female gaze, with diverse, ensnaring casts: people of color, a wide breadth of sexualities, fluid genders. This is quirky and not normal, because what is normal, what is expected, is the male gaze, is lack of diversity, and to have someone out there giving us great stories that aren’t cemented into that default? It’s vital.

But Sparkler is only just entering their second year and if they want to see a third year (and beyond), they need the support of everyone who says they support this kind of thing. (That’s you, by the way.) To keep stable, they need 2000 subscribers. Right now they have 142. They’re still small, and relatively unknown, but they deserve to be known. Their stories deserve to be read, and listened to. They deserve, and need, your support.

I admit: I have a stake in this. Multiple stakes, actually:

  1. Sparkler Monthly gives me money, because I give them words. It’s a good arrangement, and worthwhile for us both, I like to think.
  2. They publish really addictive stories, really important stories because they feature strong, diverse, female characters (and male characters, as well as those who don’t strictly adhere to that binary). And let me be clear: when I say strong I don’t intend ‘strong’ to only mean brawny-but-still-beautiful, kick-ass women. When I say strong, I mean nuanced, and potent. And deep. Women who get to be full characters. Which leads me to my last stake (and look! I could almost raise a tent with all these stakes…)
  3. Me. The third stake is me, because I’m female, and I get to see myself in the stories they publish. I’m not wallpaper, or a bed-prop, or a convenient orifice. I am a necessary, narrative creature with lungs and teeth and heart and spine, and I want more. So much more.

I know I’m not the only who wants all this. I know I’m not the only one who wants to do something. So consider a membership to Sparkler Monthly. Read up on their membership drive, and all of its excellent tiers. If you’re lacking funds, try their sampler issue, which is free to download. Also, their submissions are currently open, so if you’re looking to get published (or if you’re a voice actor), go send them something. (Something good, preferably.)

There’s continuing the conversation—and then there’s engaging and leveling it up. Make art that matters, art that syncs with this necessary diversity, and keep talking. Do everything you can, keep on and keep on, and the storyworld will grow close and colossal.

Dang—some amazing words from our Skyglass author, Jenn, re: supporting what you want to see in media! 

Filed under jenn grunigen women in media representation diversity in media sparkler membership drive

7 notes

tokyodemons:

Lianne: I’m really embarrassed the Tokyo Demons card game is taking so damn long, but we’re about 90% there. We had to switch the design team again, but the result is Ametto's super cool new design, pictured above. All card game art by the awesome Romy-chan. Gameplay (which is seamlessly and hilariously adapted from the book) by Alex O’Shea, Jo’s voice actor.
We need to find flavor text that isn’t riddled with bleeped swears. Not gonna be easy with Miki.

*makes mental note to request a copy to play-test with my local board-gaming group* 

tokyodemons:

Lianne: I’m really embarrassed the Tokyo Demons card game is taking so damn long, but we’re about 90% there. We had to switch the design team again, but the result is Ametto's super cool new design, pictured above. All card game art by the awesome Romy-chan. Gameplay (which is seamlessly and hilariously adapted from the book) by Alex O’Shea, Jo’s voice actor.

We need to find flavor text that isn’t riddled with bleeped swears. Not gonna be easy with Miki.

*makes mental note to request a copy to play-test with my local board-gaming group* 

Filed under tokyo demons the card game! romy-chan Lianne Sentar

38 notes

tactozone:

svetlania:

Want to see some of my ancient comics pages, re-tooled?? In the latest Bento Comics SketchJam, you can!  In this episode we discuss the importance of clear visual flow on a comics page and use our own sorry failures to illustrate just how crucial a concept this is.  My segment starts at about 29:25 mark, where I share pages from “Night Silver” (the old and the newer/revised versions) and also some pages from "Nightschool: The Weirn Books"

I want more “Night Silveeeeerrrr!!!” :D :D :D

This is super awesome and informative! 

Filed under bento comics awesome people saying making comics podcasts

25 notes

Sparkler Update: Our Monthly Membership Exclusive is live!

image

image

Today’s Sparkler update is an interview with Jen Lee Quick, creator of Off*Beat and Gatesmith! This is our first podcast interview, available now to members only—you can listen here: http://sparklermonthly.com/exclusive/sparkler-podcast-03/

The interview features a ton of history and background on Off*Beat and Gatesmith, some insight on the Off*Beat audio drama we’ll be doing if the membership drive reaches that level, plus great insider info as Jen talks about her process and world-building. We had an awesome time chatting with her, and we think you’ll all enjoy it a lot, too! 

Filed under sparkler monthly sparkler update membership exclusive Off*Beat Jen Lee Quick gatesmith podcast

188 notes

About Sparkler Monthly | Sparkler Monthly

svetlania:

scotty6000:

nattosoup:

Right now, Sparkler Monthly, an American manga-inspired comics anthology magazine put out by Chromatic Press is having it’s two-year membership drive.  If you follow my Twitter, you’ll know I was blowing it up last night talking about how important it is for American artists with an anime-aesthetic to support publishers that actually publish OEL manga and American anime inspired comics.

Some of my favorite American artists got their start in TokyoPop’s Rising Stars of Manga contest, and these were the artists I looked up to when I decided to go into comics myself.  Unfortunately for me, TokyoPop had sorta fouled the water with abusive contracts and poor marketing, so when it went under, nobody wanted to publish OEL or anime-inspired comics.  This meant that many artists with an anime influenced style who weren’t already published had difficulty attracting paying comic work, especially since manga-inspired styles developed a stigma as being a ‘copycat’ of Japanese manga, rather than taking influence from.  Many artists still find it difficult to find professional work, and many have difficulty finding receptive publishers for their pitches. In my opinion, this is why it’s so important to support a publication like Sparkler and a publisher like Chromatic Press.

This is a publisher that actively publishes OEL manga and manga inspired comics.  This is a publisher that publishes comics aimed at women and girls specifically.  At Chromatic Press, we aren’t a happy bycatch.  We’re the intended audience.

Maybe you’re an American artist with an anime influenced style who’s never had difficulty finding work, finding an audience, paying the bills utilizing the style you’ve cultivated over the years.  You’ve never doubted that your audience will find your work, since your reach was extended with the aid of influential friends or a publisher to promote your work.  Maybe you don’t personally need a publication like Sparkler to exist for you to make ends meet, you don’t need it as a professional goal.  Perhaps you’ve never had difficulty gaining the respect of your peers, and people have always taken you seriously as a comic artist.

You should still consider supporting Sparkler in order to check out talent, new and old.  You should consider signal boosting their Membership Drive Tweets and posts, to introduce your own fans to this publication and to the artists within.  

If Sparkler doesn’t gain enough new members, if Chromatic Press doesn’t see enough sales, they’ll fold just like many of the other publishers who’ve focused on OEL manga.  They wont fold because of a lack of talent, skill, or drive, but because they didn’t get enough support.  Not enough people know about Sparkler Magazine, not enough aspiring creators realize what it’s taken artists like myself years to realize- the market you enjoy as a professional stems from the market you supported while still learning.  If you enjoy manga inspired comics, like OEL manga, or want to see more American shoujo comics, you should support Sparkler in any way you can.

Reblog the hell out of this! Go support them! I recently got a one year subscription! Even just a one month trial means a lot.

Please take the time to spread the word about Sparkler Monthly!

I am a paying Sparkler subscriber and already own several of their print editions, because a) they’ve got exciting new stuff I haven’t seen before and b) they’re building a new publishing avenue for us creators and That Is Amazing and Doesn’t Happen Often because it’s frikking HARD. They need bricks so they can keep building, so if you are a part of the culture, it’s in Your Interests that they be able to continue this!

Feast your eyes on all the stuff they have and then join usssss:

http://sparklermonthly.com/membership-drive/

*hugs Svet*

Thanks for your kind words, darling! (hopefully we’ll get you working for us one of these days!!)

Filed under sparkler membership drive